• Headaches & Migraines

    We specialize in the treatment and management of Headache and Migraine disorders.

    read more
  • Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders

    We are specialists in Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders from over 30+ years experience.

    read more
  • Epilepsy & Seizure Disorders

    Our doctors use the latest technology to help our patients live a calm, seizure free lifestyle.

    read more
  • Neuromuscular

    Don’t live in pain. Our neurologists are certified in the diagnosis and treatment of neuromuscular diseases.

    read more
  • Dizziness & Balance

    Dizziness can impair your everyday activities. Let us help you sort it all out.

    read more

Headaches & Migraines

Headaches and Migraines

headache migraineWe have a Headache Center that is in place for patients that suffer from Chronic or Persistent headaches and Migraines. Living with Migraines or headaches makes it hard to do every day activities. At Princeton and Rutgers Neurology, we understand that and will do everything in our power to help relieve you of this distress.

Types of headaches:
Migraine vs Chronic Migraine
Tension-type headache
Cluster headache
Other primary headache

 

I have migraines.

What do I need to know?

If you suspect you suffer from Chronic Migraine or headache, or if you’ve already been diagnosed, know that you are not alone. To confirm a diagnosis, talk to a Headache Specialist. Haven’t seen a Headache Specialist yet? Schedule and appointment and consult our physicians.

 

Somerset Facility Location & Phone Number

Monroe Facility Location & Phone Number

Princeton Facility Location & Phone Number

 

Additional information on Headaches: (cited from nih.gov)

What is Headache?

There are four types of headache:  vascular, muscle contraction (tension), traction, and inflammatory.  The most common type of vascular headache is migraine. Migraine headaches are usually characterized by severe pain on one or both sides of the head, an upset stomach, and, at times, disturbed vision.   Women are more likely than men to have migraine headaches.    After migraine, the most common type of vascular headache is the toxic headache produced by fever.  Other kinds of vascular headaches include “cluster” headaches, which cause repeated episodes of intense pain, and headaches resulting from high blood pressure.  Muscle contraction headaches appear to involve the tightening or tensing of facial and neck muscles.  Traction and inflammatory headaches are symptoms of other disorders, ranging from stroke to sinus infection.  Like other types of pain, headaches can serve as warning signals of more serious disorders. This is particularly true for headaches caused by inflammation, including those related to meningitis as well as those resulting from diseases of the sinuses, spine, neck, ears, and teeth.

Is there any treatment?

When headaches occur three or more times a month, preventive treatment is usually recommended.  Drug therapy, biofeedback training, stress reduction, and elimination of certain foods from the diet are the most common methods of preventing and controlling migraine and other vascular headaches. Regular exercise, such as swimming or vigorous walking, can also reduce the frequency and severity of migraine headaches.  Drug therapy for migraine is often combined with biofeedback and relaxation training.  One of the most commonly used drugs for the relief of migraine symptoms is sumatriptan.  Drugs used to prevent migraine also include methysergide maleate, which counteracts blood vessel constriction; propranolol hydrochloride, which also reduces the frequency and severity of migraine headaches; ergotamine tartrate, a vasoconstrictor that helps counteract the painful dilation stage of the headache; amitriptyline, an antidepressant; valproic acid, an anticonvulsant; and verapamil, a calcium channel blocker.

What is the prognosis?

Not all headaches require medical attention. But some types of headache are signals of more serious disorders and call for prompt medical care. These include: sudden, severe headache or sudden headache associated with a stiff neck; headaches associated with fever, convulsions, or accompanied by confusion or loss of consciousness; headaches following a blow to the head, or associated with pain in the eye or ear; persistent headache in a person who was previously headache free; and recurring headache in children.  Migraine headaches may last a day or more and can strike as often as several times a week or as rarely as once every few years.

Hospital Affiliation




Accreditations

   


Princeton and Rutgers Neurology is not affiliated with Rutgers University